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Event: ST SEVERE LOCAL STORM
Number: 1998-000005
Country: USA United States
Location: Northeast
Date (YMD): 1998-1-
Time:
Duration:
Magnitude:
Information Source:National Climatic Data Center (http://lwf.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/reports/billionz.html#chron)
Comments: "During the week of January 5-9, 1998, the eastern U.S. and eastern Canada were severely effected by a storm system with a very deep southerly flow and abundant moisture. This resulted in flooding rains from the lower Mississippi valley through the southeast and into the northeast, several tornadoes, and a severe ice storm in parts of the northeast/New England and into Canada. The death toll for the event: Flood-related: Tennessee--7 North Carolina--2 South Carolina--1 Kentucky--1 Alabama--1 Ice storm-related: New York--9 Maine--5 New Hampshire--2 The heaviest rains and most severe flooding occurred in the mountains of North Carolina and northeast Tennessee, where up to 16 inches fell in a 2-day period. See below for some of the rainfall totals. Surveys indicate over 500 homes destroyed or with severe damage in North Carolina, and over 200 homes severely damaged or destroyed in Tennessee. Damages exceeded $15 million for western North Carolina and $20 million for eastern Tennessee. Tornado touchdowns produced some damage in Dublin, Georgia and Easley, South Carolina. Flooding also was a problem in parts of the lower Mississippi valley and upstate New York. The severe ice storm mainly affected upstate New York, northern New Hampshire and Vermont, much of Maine, and southeast Canada. Some locations received over 3 inches of rain (as freezing rain), with radial ice thickness of one inch or more. Canada reported over 3 million utility customers without power immediately after the storm, while the northeast through New England reported over 500,000 customers without power. 80% of Maine's population lost electrical service. Overall damages approached $3 billion for Canada and were at least $1.4 billion for the U.S.
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FL-1998-000005-USA
Flood,United States: During the week of January 5-9, 1998, the eastern U.S. and eastern Canada were severely effected by a storm system with a very deep southerly flow and abundant moisture. This resulted in flooding rains from the lower Mississippi valley through the southeast and into the northeast, several tornadoes, and a severe ice storm in parts of the northeast/New England and into Canada. The death toll for the event: Flood-related: Tennessee--7 North Carolina--2 South Carolina--1 Kentucky--1 Alabama--1 Ice storm-related: New York--9 Maine--5 New Hampshire--2 The heaviest rains and most severe flooding occurred in the mountains of North Carolina and northeast Tennessee, where up to 16 inches fell in a 2-day period. See below for some of the rainfall totals. Surveys indicate over 500 homes destroyed or with severe damage in North Carolina, and over 200 homes severely damaged or destroyed in Tennessee. Damages exceeded $15 million for western North Carolina and $20 million for eastern Tennessee. Tornado touchdowns produced some damage in Dublin, Georgia and Easley, South Carolina. Flooding also was a problem in parts of the lower Mississippi valley and upstate New York. The severe ice storm mainly affected upstate New York, northern New Hampshire and Vermont, much of Maine, and southeast Canada. Some locations received over 3 inches of rain (as freezing rain), with radial ice thickness of one inch or more. Canada reported over 3 million utility customers without power immediately after the storm, while the northeast through New England reported over 500,000 customers without power. 80% of Maine's population lost electrical service. Overall damages approached $3 billion for Canada and were at least $1.4 billion for the U.S.